Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for tag: Gallbladder Attack

By Gastroenterology Specialists, Inc.
March 30, 2022
Gallbladder AttackYour gallbladder is a small organ on the upper right side of your abdomen that’s responsible for storing and releasing bile to aid in digestion. As with any organ or system in the body, problems can occur. When bile and minerals develop into deposits or gallstones in the gallbladder, this can lead to very severe and sudden pain. Recognizing the signs of a gallbladder attack can mean getting the quicker care you need from a gastroenterologist.

What is a gallbladder attack?

A gallbladder attack is often what happens when there is a gallstone blockage in the duct of the gallbladder. Symptoms can last where from a few minutes to a few hours, but it’s important to seek immediate medical attention if you are dealing with severe abdominal pain. The attack may go away on its own without any complications, but it’s still important that you schedule an appointment with your gastroenterologist to make sure that your symptoms are due to a gallbladder attack and to rule out other potential health problems.

What are the signs and symptoms of a gallbladder attack?

Wondering if you could be dealing with a gallbladder attack? You could be if you are experiencing:
  • A dull, sharp, or cramping pain in the upper right side or center of the abdomen
  • Pain that radiates to the back or shoulder blades
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes (also known as jaundice)
Are there risk factors for gallstones?

As with most health problems, certain risk factors could increase your chances of developing gallstones. You may be more likely to experience gallstones during your lifetime if:
  • You have a family history of gallstones or gallbladder problems
  • You are obese or overweight
  • You have a low-fiber, high-cholesterol diet
  • You take certain medications such as birth control or hormone replacement therapy
  • You have diabetes
  • You are pregnant
  • You are over 40 years old
  • You have been diagnosed with liver disease
How is a gallbladder attack treated?

If the gallstone is passed on its own without problems then no treatment is necessary; however, sometimes medications or shockwaves are used to break up the gallstones. If you are dealing with recurring gallbladder pain, your gastroenterologist may recommend having your gallbladder removed.

If you are dealing with severe or sudden abdominal pain it’s important to seek immediate medical attention, as a gallbladder attack isn’t the only thing that can lead to sudden stomach pain. If you find yourself dealing with frequent gallbladder issues you may wish to speak with a gastroenterologist about whether to have the organ removed.
By Gastroenterology Specialists, Inc.
August 18, 2020
GallbladderChances are good that you probably never think about your gallbladder. This small organ that lies under the liver is responsible for producing and storing bile to help the liver break down high-fat foods. Of course, you may start thinking about your gallbladder if you start to notice these symptoms of a gallbladder attack:
  • Sudden, severe, and sharp abdominal pain (typically in the upper right side of the body)
  • Pain that appears after eating and lasts several hours
  • Light-colored stools
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Yellowing skin or eyes (jaundice)
You must see a doctor right away if you are experiencing gallbladder pain or any other symptoms of an attack. That’s because there are other potentially dangerous health problems such as appendicitis or a heart attack that can also mimic the pain and other symptoms associated with a gallbladder attack, and it’s important to rule out these other conditions. Plus, if the body is unable to pass the gallstones on its own this can also lead to an infection.

Am I at risk for gallstones?

Many factors can increase your risk of developing gallstones such as:
  • Diabetes
  • Family history of gallstones and gallbladder disease
  • Being over 60 years old
  • Being a woman
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Taking estrogen or hormone medications
  • Eating a diet that is low in fiber and high in cholesterol or fat
  • Being pregnant
How is a gallbladder attack treated?

It is possible to have gallstones and never experience symptoms. In this case, you probably won’t require treatment unless there is the possibility of a complication. Sometimes medications are prescribed that can help to break up the gallstones. It may be time to consider having surgery to remove your gallbladder if:
  • You’re dealing with severe cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder)
  • There is an infection
  • The gallbladder doesn’t work or has stopped working
  • The gallbladder is causing significant pain and other problems
  • There is a tumor on the gallbladder
If you are dealing with gallstones or gallbladder pain and want to discuss ways to prevent these problems in the future, or whether you should have your gallbladder removed, talk with a gastroenterologist today to learn more. Your doctor can tell you the best way to treat your gallbladder symptoms or whether you may need to consider surgery.