Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for: December, 2019

By Gastroenterology Specialists, Inc.
December 16, 2019
Category: Gastroenterology

Persistent pain in your stomach or abdomen could be a signal of irritable bowel syndrome, which should be treated by a gastroenterologist.

Irritable bowel syndrome, also known as IBS, affects your large intestine and can be caused by poor functioning of your gastrointestinal nervous system as it relates to your GI function. The condition causes the walls of your intestines to not move as they should, which impairs the passage of food from your stomach through your intestines.

Irritable bowel syndrome has several signs and symptoms. According to the Mayo Clinic, you may experience:

  • Moderate to severe abdominal pain and cramping
  • Frequent or chronic gas and bloating
  • Frequent or chronic diarrhea or constipation
  • Mucus occurring frequently in your stools

When you have irritable bowel syndrome, you can lessen your symptoms by practicing a few simple tips like these:

  • Limiting or avoiding spicy foods, fats, nightshade vegetables, beans, fruits, milk, carbonated drinks, alcohol, and chocolate
  • Limiting or avoiding high-gluten content foods and foods with a high sugar content
  • Managing your stress with exercise, meditation, and yoga

Irritable bowel syndrome is best treated by your gastroenterologist. Professional treatments for IBS include:

  • Prescription-strength anti-diarrheal medications
  • Prescription-strength medications to reduce intestinal spasms
  • Antibiotics to treat any underlying infection or bacterial imbalance
  • Medications to relax the colon, including Alosetron
  • Medications to increase fluid secretion like Lubiprostone
  • Dietary and lifestyle counseling

Irritable bowel syndrome can be effectively treated by your gastroenterologist. Professional treatment for IBS can help you live a life free of annoying and painful symptoms. To find out more about the causes and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, talk with your gastroenterologist today!


By Gastroenterology Specialists, Inc.
December 03, 2019
Category: Gastroenterology

Lactose intolerance is the body's inability to properly digest lactose, a type of sugar that is present in milk, cheese, and other dairy-based items. This is due to a deficiency in lactase, a digestive enzyme present in the small intestine. Some people are affected with lactose intolerance from birth, while others develop the condition later in life. This acquired intolerance may be due to the quality and quantity of the enzyme breaking down, or it may be a secondary response to another digestive problem such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, or celiac disease. Lactose intolerance varies in intensity, but it can cause bloating, gas, stomach cramps, and diarrhea within two hours of eating or drinking dairy products. A common digestive issue, it has been estimated that 65 percent of the world's population has some form of lactose intolerance.

Testing for lactose intolerance often starts with the patient ingesting dairy products in a clinical setting so the physician can observe the results. Determining if the intolerance is due to enzyme deficiency or an underlying condition, as mentioned above, is also essential. One of the most reliable tests involves measuring the level of hydrogen in a person's breath after drinking a lactose solution. Hydrogen is a byproduct of the bacteria in the digestive system if lactose cannot be processed efficiently.

Blood tests are another way that doctors can determine lactose intolerance. Over a period of hours and several draws, the sugar in the blood—glucose—will rise slowly in patients who are lactose intolerant. The easiest and most accurate test for infants is a stool acidity test; those whose bodies cannot process lactose will have a low pH level in their stools due to the presence of acid.

People who are diagnosed with lactose intolerance often find that avoiding foods with dairy products is the easiest way to manage their condition. Lactase replacement medication is also available over-the-counter; these supplements can be taken just before consuming a meal with dairy products to temporarily colonize the digestive system with lactase enzymes.